Faculty

Erick Villagomez releases new book

SCARP Instructor Erick Villagomez has released his new book: The Laws of Settlements. 

Are there fundamental laws that govern all settlements—from the smallest village to the largest cities? The Laws of Settlements ambitiously describes the principles underlying human settlements of all sizes and across all cultures. It revives, updates and refreshes the ’54 Laws of Settlements’ outlined in Constantinos Apostolou Doxiadis’ seminal book Ekistics: An Introduction to the Science of Human Settlements, making them relevant to the problems we face in the 21st century.

Director Penny Gurstein's farewell message

(Although Penny is ending her term as SCARP Director, she will continue in her role as Professor at SCARP. She will be teaching, supervising students and working with the newly formed Housing Research Collaborative.)

I am ending my 10-year term on August 31, 2018 and a new Director, Dr. Heather Campbell will be starting on Sept. 1, 2018.  Heather is coming from University of Sheffield in the UK and we at SCARP are excited about having her join SCARP.   

Alex Bigazzi calls for caution with drone corridors plan

Assistant professor Alex Bigazzi was asked to comment on the Vancouver-Surrey joint project to create crash free corridors for drones and other autonomous vehicles. The plan is the two cities' joint entry in the Infrastructure Canada’s Smart Cities Challenge. The prize is $50 million.

Bigazzi's says: “As long as this is done cautiously and prudently, this is a good opportunity to explore better ways to integrate autonomous vehicles with non-autonomous vehicles and cyclists and pedestrians,” 

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Most Metro Vancouver councillors support mandatory water metering

While few households in Metro Vancouver have water meters, the political will for mandatory metering is strong, according to a new survey conducted this summer by researchers at the School of Community and Regional Planning of the University of British Columbia.

The researchers surveyed elected councillors and mayors in the region and found that 68 per cent are in favour of mandatory water metering.

In a survey of 45 elected councillors and mayors in the region, they found 68 per cent were in favour of mandatory water metering, with the rest being opposed (19 per cent) or neutral (14 per cent).

“While cities such as Victoria, West Vancouver and Richmond have been able to provide a water meter to nearly all residents, much of British Columbia and many cities in Metro Vancouver are far behind national coverage rates – most cities have no water metering policy and have been hesitant to introduce water meters,” said report author Jordi Honey-Rosés, an associate professor in the School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP) at UBC.

“It’s important to understand why elected officials’ might be hesitant to go forward with stronger action on water metering. Political...

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